About this Show

Closing Bell With Maria Bartiromo

News/Business. Maria Bartiromo. Analysis of the day's winners and losers in the stock market. New.

NETWORK

DURATION
01:01:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel v58

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 14, Massachusetts 13, America 7, Starbucks 6, Obama 5, Boston 5, Washington 3, Kentucky 3, Menino 2, Howard Schultz 2, Jan 2, Eamon Javers 2, Ted Kennedy 2, New York 2, Underinsured 2, United States Postal 2, Cobra 1, Heather 1, Diana 1, Goldwater 1,
Borrow a DVD
of this show
  CNBC    Closing Bell With Maria Bartiromo    News/Business. Maria Bartiromo. Analysis of the  
   day's winners and losers in the stock market. New.  

    October 30, 2013
    4:00 - 5:01pm EDT  

4:00pm
administration is dealing with serious trouble. >> by the way, markets are closing right now. as we head toward the close, the dow down 62 points. much of that decline attributable to ibm today. but, it came after the fed statement came out where they left interest rates unchanged and the interest rates moved higher as well. up five basis points on the ten-year note. that's how we finish the day. no record highs. an unusual time for the stock market. we've been seeing those a lot lately here. >> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is. we've been waiting on the president in boston, speaking about the health care glitches for the obama care website. eamon javers is here with me, previewing what the president will say, and he'll be coming out shortly. duval patrick at the podium. do you expect the president to offer apologies for glitches or -- the president is coming right now. let's toss it over to the live
4:01pm
shot and get your reaction after we hear from the president. here now, president barack obama. hello, boston! >> it's good to be back in boston. it's good to be back in boston because one of america's best governors introduced me, duvall patrick. give him a big, long applause. it's good to see congressman bill keating here. give bill a big round of applau applause. i want to praise somebody who is not here. i just left him. but he wears his heart on his
4:02pm
sleeve. he loves this city so much, and it shows in what he's been doing for years now. one of america's best mayors, tom menino. and it's good to see all of you. you know, i was just at the airport, duvall was nice enough to meet me and mayor menino. mayor menino went back to city hall to work so he could wrap up in time for the first pitch. i'm well aware a presidential visit is not the biggest thing going on today in boston. i understand that. i tried to grow a beard. but michelle, she wasn't having
4:03pm
it. i am old enough to remember when the red sox were not in the world series three times in ten years. but i know the chance to win one at home for the first time since 1918 is a pretty special thing. so, i promise, we will be done here in time to be everybody to head over to fenway and maybe see big papi blast another homer. and maybe the other sox will do better next year. i'm just -- you know, you can hope. you can dream. the reason i'm here, though, is because this is the hall where seven years ago democrats and republicans came together to make health reform a reality for
4:04pm
the people of massachusetts. it's where then-governor mitt romney, democratic legislators, senator ted kennedy, many of the folks who are here today, joined forces, to connect the progressive vision of health care for all with some ideas about markets and competition that had long been championshiped by conservatives. and as deval just said, it worked. it worked. health care -- >> mr. president -- [ inaudible ] >> okay.
4:05pm
we're talking about health care today, but we will -- [ inaudible ] >> hold on. it's okay. that is the wrong rally. we've got -- [ applause ] we had the climate change rally back in the summer. this is the health care rally. so health care reform in this state was a success. that doesn't mean it was perfect
4:06pm
right away. there were early problems to solve. there were changes that had to be made. anybody here who was involved in it can tell you that. as deval just said, enrollment was extremely slow. within a month, only about 100 people had signed up. 100. but then 2,000 had signed up. and then a few more thousand after that. and by the end of the year, 36,000 people had signed up. and the community all came together. you even had the red sox help enlist people to get them covered. and pretty soon the number of young uninsured people had plummeted. when recession struck, the financial security of health care sheltered families from deeper hardship.
4:07pm
and today, there is nearly universal coverage in massachusetts. and the vast majority of its citizens are happy with its coverage. by the way, all the parade of horribles, the worst predictions about health care reform in massachusetts never came true. they're the same arguments you're hearing now. businesses didn't stop covering workers. people didn't get left behind. racial disparities decreased. care didn't become unaffordable, costs tracked. what was happening in other places that wasn't covering everybody. now, you know, mitt romney and i ran a long and spirited campaign
4:08pm
against one another, but i always believed that when he was governor, here in massachusetts, he did the right thing on health care. and then deval did the right thing by picking up the torch and working to make the law work even better. and it's because you guys had a proven model that we built the affordable care act on this template of proven bipartisan success. your law was the model for the nation's law. so, let's look what's happened. today the affordable care act requires insurance companies to abide by some of the strongest consumer protections this country has ever known. a true patients bill of rights.
4:09pm
no more discriminating against kids with preexisting conditions. no more dropping your policy when you get sick and need it most. no more lifetime limits or restricted annual limits. most plans -- most plans now have to cover free preventive care like mammograms and birth control. young people can stay on their parents' plan until they turn 26. all of this is in place right now. it is working right now. now, the last element of this
4:10pm
began on october 1st, when the affordable care act created a new marketplace for quality, private insurance plans, for the 15% or so of americans who don't have health care. and for the 5% of americans who have to buy it on their own and they're not part of a group. which means they don't get as good a deal. and this new marketplace was built on the massachusetts model. it allows these americans, who have been locked out, to get better insurance. they're pooling from one big group, and insurers want their business and they give them a better deal. and they compete for that business. as a result, insurers in the marketplace, they can't use your medical history to charge you more. if you've been sick, you finally have the same chance to buy quality affordable health care as everybody else. a lot of people will qualify for
4:11pm
new tax credits under this law that will bring down health care costs even further, so if you lose your job or if you start a new business or you're self-employed or you're a young person trying several jobs until you find that one that sticks, you're going to be able to be insured. insurance that goes with you and gives you freedom to pursue whatever you want, without fear that accident or illness will derail your dreams. this marketplace is open now. insurance companies are competing for that business. the deal is good. the prices are low. but, let's face it, we've had a problem. the website hasn't worked the way it's supposed to. over these last couple of weeks. adds a consequence, a lot of people haven't had a chance to see how good the prices for
4:12pm
quality health insurance through these marketplaces really are. now ultimately this website, healthcare.gov, will be the easiest way to shop for and buy these new plans, because you can see these plans next to each other and compare prices and see what kind of coverage it provid provides. but, look, there's no denying it. the website is too slow. too many people have gotten stuck, and i'm not happy about it. and neither are a lot of americans who need health care and they're trying to figure out how they can sign up as quickly as possible. so there's no excuse for it. i take full responsibility for making sure it gets fixed asap. we are working overtime to improve it every day. every day. [ applause ]
4:13pm
more people are successfully buying these plans online than a few weeks ago. i expect more people will be able to buy conveniently online every single day as we move forward. we'll get these problems resolved. now, in the meantime, can you still apply for coverage over the phone or by mail or in person. because those plans are waiting. and you're still able to get the affordable, reliable health insurance that's been out of reach for too many people for too long. so, i am old enough to remember when there was not such a thing as a website. i know that's shocking to people. but the point is, i'm confident these marketplaces will work because massachusetts has shown that the model works. and we know what's being offered by these insurers. we know it's going to work.
4:14pm
and so far choice and competition in the new national marketplaces have helped keep costs low are than even we projected. in fact, nearly half of all single, uninsured 18 to 34-year-olds may be able to buy insurance for 50 bucks a month or less. less than your cell phone bill. less than your cable bill. one steady shows 6 in 10 uninsured americans may find coverage for 100 bucks or less, even if they're older than 34. and, frankly, if every governor was working as hard as deval or governor o'malley in maryland or governor cuomo in new york to make this work for their
4:15pm
citizens as opposed to thinking politically, about 8 in 10 americans would be getting health insurance for less than 100 bucks a month. and, by the way, it's not just in massachusetts. look at kentucky. governor steven basheer, who's a democrat, is like a man possessed with helping more people get covered. he thinks it's the right thing to do. keep in mind, i did not win in ken. kentucky. but there are a lot of uninsured people in kentucky, and they're signing up. oregon has covered 10% of its uninsured citizens already because of the affordable care act. 10% of the uninsured have already been covered. arkansas, i didn't win that
4:16pm
state either, has covered almost 14% of its uninsured already. that's already happened. and you've got some republican governors, like governors s kas of ohio. unfortunately, there are others that are so locked into the politics of this thing that they won't lift a finger to help their own people. that's leaving millions of americans uninsured unnecessarily. that's a shame. because if they put as many energy into making this law work as they do into attacking the law, americans would be better off. americans would be better off.
4:17pm
so that's the affordable care act. better protections for americans with insurance, a new marketplace for americans without insurance, new tax credits to help folks afford it, more choice, more competition, real health care security. not just for the uninsured or underinsured, but for all of us, because we pay more in premiums and taxes so those without good insurance visit the emergency room. we get taxed. and since we all benefit, there are parts of this law that also require everybody to contribute. that require everybody to take some measure of responsibility. so, to help pay for the law, the wealthiest americans, families who make more than $250,000 a year, they have to pay a little bit more. the most expensive employer health insurance plans no longer
4:18pm
qualify for unlimited tax breaks. some folks aren't happy about that, but it's the right thing to do. just like in massachusetts, most people who can afford health insurance have to take responsibility to buy health insurance or pay a penalty. employers with more than 50 employees are required to provide health insurance to their employees or pay a penalty. because they shouldn't just dump off those costs to the rest of us. everybody has some responsibilities. now, it is also true that some americans who have health insurance plans that they bought on their own through the old individual market are getting notices from their insurance companies suggesting somehow because the affordable care act, they may be losing their existing health insurance plans. this has been the latest flurry in the news. because there's been a lot of confusion and misinformation about this. i want to explain just what's going on.
4:19pm
one of the things health reform was designed to do was to help not only the uninsured but the underinsured. and there are a number of americans -- fewer than 5% of americans -- who've got cut-rate plans that don't offer real financial protection in the event of a serious illness or an accident. remember, before the affordable care act, these bad apple insurers had free reign every single year to limit the care you received or used minor preexisting conditions to jack up your premiums or bill you into bankruptcy. so, a lot of people thought they were buying coverage and it turned out not to be so good. before the affordable care act, the worst of these plans routinely drop thousands of americans every single year. and on average premiums for folks who stayed in their plans for more than a year shot up about 15% a year.
4:20pm
this wasn't just bad for these folks who had these policies. it was bad for all of us. because, again, when tragedy strikes and folks can't pay their medical bills, everybody else picks up the tab. now, if you had one of these substandard plans before the affordable care act became law and you really liked that plan, you are able to keep it. that's what i said when i was running for office. that was part of the promise we made. but ever since the law was passed, if insurers decided to downgrade or cancel these substandard plans, under the law we said you have to replace them with comprehensive coverage because that, too, was a central premise of the affordable care act from the very beginning. and today that promise means that every plan in the marketplace covers a core set of minimum benefits like preventive
4:21pm
care, mental health care, prescription drug benefits and hospitalization. they can't use allergies or pregnancy or a sports injury or the fact that you're a woman to charge you more. they can't do that anymore. they can't do that anymore. if you can't afford coverage because your child had asthma, he's now covered. if you're one in 45 million americans with a mental illness, you're now covered. if you're a young couple expecting a baby, you're covered. you're safer. the system is more secure for and you it's more secure for everybody. so, if you're getting one of these letters, just shop around in the new marketplace. that's what it's for. because of the tax credits we're offering and the competition -- [ inaudible ]
4:22pm
because of the tax credits we're offering and the competition between insurers, most people are going to be able to get better comprehensive health care plans for the same price or even cheaper than projected. you're going to get a better deal. now, there's a fraction of americans with higher incomes who will pay more on the front end for better insurance and better benefits and protection bill of rights and that will protect them from financial ruin if they get sick, but nobody's losing their right to health care coverage. and no insurance company will ever be able to deny you coverage or drop you as a customer all together. those days are over. and that's the truth. that is the truth.
4:23pm
[ applause ] so for people without health insurance, they're finally going to be able to get it. for the vast majority of people who have health insurance that works, you can keep it. for the fewer than 5% of americans who buy insurance on your own, you will be getting a better deal. so anyone peddling the notion that insurers are cancelling people's plan without mentioning all the insurers are encouraging them to join different plans with strong carriers and stronger protections while others get insurance through-w new carriers through the marketplace, and many will get new help to pay for these better plans and make them actually cheaper, if you leave that stuff out, you're being grossly misleaded, to say the least.
4:24pm
but, frankly, lose, you saw this in massachusetts. this is one of the challenges of health care reform. health care is complicated and it's very personal. and it's easy to scare folks. and it's no surprise that some of the same folks trying to scare people now are the same folks who have been trying to sink the affordable care act from the beginning. you know, frankly, i don't understand it. providing people with health care, that should be a no-brainer. giving people a chance to get health care should be a no-brainer. and i've said before, folks had actually good ideas, better ideas, than what's happening in
4:25pm
massachusetts, or what we've proposed, for providing people with health insurance, i'd be happy to listen. but that's not what's happening. and anyone defending the remnants of the old broken system, as if it was working for people, anybody who thinks we shouldn't finish the job of making the health care system work for everybody, especially when these folks offer no plan for the uninsured, underinsured, or folks who lose their insurance every year, those folks should have to explain themselves. because i don't think we should go back to discriminating against kids with preexisting conditions. i don't think we should go back to dropping coverage for people when they get sick or because
4:26pm
they make a mistake on their application. i don't think we should go back to the daily cruelties and indignanties and constant insecurity of a broken health care system. and i'm confident most americans agree with me. so, yes, this is hard. because the health care system's a big system. and it's complicated. and if it was hard doing it just in one state, it's harder to do it in all 50 states. especially when the governors of a bunch of states, and half of the congress, aren't trying to help. yeah. it's hard, but it's worth it. it is the right thing to do. and we're going to keep moving
4:27pm
forward. we are going to keep working to improve the law just like you did here in massachusetts. we are just going to keep on working at it. we're going to grind it out. just like you did here in massachusetts. by the way, just like we did when the prescription drug program for seniors, known as medicare part "d," was passed by a republican president a decade ago. that health care law had some early challenges as well. there were even problems with the web cited. the website. and democrats weren't happy with a lot of the aspects of the law because, in part, it added hundreds of billions of dollars to the deficit. it wasn't unpaid for, like the
4:28pm
affordable health care act, which will actually help pay for the deficit. but, you know, once it was the law, everybody pitched in to try to make it work. democrats weren't about to punish millions of seniors just to make a point or settle a score. so democrats worked with republicans to make it work. and i'm proud of democrats for having done that. it was the right thing to do. because now about 90% of seniors like what they have. they've gotten a better deal. both parties working together to get the job done. that's what we need in washington right now. that's what we need in washington right now.
4:29pm
if republicans in congress were as eager to help americans get coverage as some republican governors have shown themselves to be, we would make a lot of progress. i'm not asking them to agree with me on everything. but if they'd work with us like mitt romney did working with democrats in massachusetts, or like ted kennedy often did with republicans in congress, including on the prescription drug bill, we'd be a lot further along. so, the point is, we may have political disagreements. we do. deep ones. in some cases we have fundamentally different decisions about where we should take the country. but the people who elect us to serve, they shouldn't pay the price for those disagreements. most mernamericans don't see th through a political lens, ideological lens. this debate has never been about right or left.
4:30pm
it's been about the helplessness that a parent feels when she can't cover a sick child. or the impossible choices a small business faces between covering his employees or keeping his doors open. i want to give you just -- i want to close with an example. a person named alan schaeffer, he's from prattsburg, new york and he has a story about sacrifice, giving up his own health care to save the woman he loves. alan wrote to me last week. and he told me his story. four years ago his wife, jan, who happens to be a nurse, was struck with cancer. and she had to stop working. halfway through her chemo, her employer dropped coverage for both of them. and alan's self-employed. he has an antique business. so, he had to make sure his wife had coverage, obviously, in the
4:31pm
middle of cancer treatment, so he went without insurance. the great news today is jan is cancer-free. she's on medicare. but alan has been uninsured ever since. until last week. when he sat down -- when he sat down at a computer and, i'm sure after multiple tries, signed up for a new plan under the affordable care act. coverage that can never be taken away if he gets sick. i just want to read you what he said in this letter. he says, i've got to tell you, i've never been so happy to pay
4:32pm
a bill in my entire life. when you don't have insurance at my age, it can really feel like a time bomb waiting to go off. the sense of relief from knowing i can live out my days longer and healthier, that's just a tremendous weight off my shoulders. so, two days later, alan goes over to his buddy bill's house. he sits bill down and his wife diana at their computer. and after several tries, alan helped lift that weight from their shoulders by helping them to sign up for a new plan also. and compared to their current plan, it costs less than half as much and covers more. see, that's why we committed ourselves to this cause. for alan and jan, for bill, diana pp, for annie, for anyone
4:33pm
who wrote letters and shared stories and knocked on doors, because they believed what can happen here in massachusetts can happen all across the country. and for them and for you, we are going to see this through. we're going to see this through. we are going to see this through. this hall is home to some of the earliest debates over the nature our government, the appropriate size, the appropriate role of our government. and those debates continue today
4:34pm
and that's healthy. they're debates about the role of the individual. and society, rugged individualism, self-reliance, freedoms whose first shot rang out not far from here. but also debates tempered by the recognition that we're in this all together. and when hardship strikes, and it could strike any of us at any moment, we're there for one another. and that as a country, we can accomplish great things that we can't accomplish alone. we believe that. we believe that and those
4:35pm
sentiments, those sentiments are expressed in a painting right here in this very hall. liberty and union, now and forever, one and inseparable. that's the value statement i was talking about. that's what health care reform is about. that's what america's about. we are in this together and we are going to see it through. thank you. god bless you. god bless the united states of america. >> major speech by president obama about the health care reform. he said, we are going to keep working, keep moving forward. we're going to see this through despite these computer glitches. he did acknowledge that there are many people who are receiving cancellation notices. and said, some americans who have had plans that they bought on their own are getting notices
4:36pm
that their existing plans do not apply to the new law. he said these people have had cut-rate plans that do not offer real help in the face of accidents or a curveball that life will throw you. he said, ever since the law was passed, if insurers decided to cancel your plan, they have to replace it with a new plan. today that means every plan that's covered, a core set of -- like mental care, maternity care. i want to bring in eamon javers. i guess what he didn't say are the plans that are being replaced are a lot more expensive than the plans that were in place. that's what we're hearing from our viewers. that they are getting sticker shock. >> right. a lot of people are complaining they're being cut off from cheap plans and being put onto more expensive plans. the president making the case this only applies to 5% of the
4:37pm
population that is in that individual care market. what's more, he said, they'll get a better deal if they go on the exchanges and shop around. of course, if they can get on the website and make that happen. the president acknowledging there have been problems with the website and the process. he says he takes full responsibility for making sure it gets fixed. kind of making a joke out of it by the end saying one success story, one family was able to get health care, after a few times. hecklers interrupting with keystone pipeline. president using humor in a very difficult moment for the president. >> there was a heckler in the room that was escorted out. >> yeah, that's right. >> in the middle of the speech. >> there was a man and a woman. they were chanting about the keystone pipeline, attacking the president from the political left and escorted out of the speech. he said, you're at the wrong rally. the climate change rally was this summer. >> thank you. i want to turn to one corporate
4:38pm
leader who certainly has been sharing real leadership in business. starbucks serving up its latest earnings tonight. as we were listening to the president, the company reported earnings better than expected. 63 cents a share vertsz an estimate of 60 cents, revenue of $3.8 billion. joining me, howard schultz, one of the business leaders who has handled obama care as a positive for business and the country. howard, thank you for joining us. >> thank you, maria. how are you? >> i'm good. before we get into the business at hand, starbucks earnings, what was your reaction to the president's speech on obama care? i know you've supported this idea that health care should be available to everyone. what are your thoughts as we watch the president defend what has been a tough launch? >> i think at starbucks we come at this in a unique way. we have been providing comprehensive health care insurance to all of our
4:39pm
employees, including part-time employees who work 20 hours a week for years. our plan is better than the affordable plan that the president is add advocating for. it is law and we have to accept that. what i would say is unfortunately in this kind of situation, execution trumps strategy. it might be a great strategy but execution is flawed, off the rails. and i think what the country needs now is real honesty and transparency and truth about what's really going on. and i would say the president and the administration really needs to work with congress now to refine the situation, fix it, and present it to the american people in a way that it will work, it will be understandable and we can get on with it. but it's really unfortunate that we're in a situation where there's such a fracturing of trust and confidence in the law, the website and the entire situation. and i think the administration should come clean with 100%
4:40pm
transparency, what is really the situation, how long it's going to take to fix it, the privacy issues, because it really is so cloudy now under such a burden. and it's very, very unfortunate for the american people. >> now, i love the idea that you provide health insurance for people even working just 20 hours a week, howard. i mean, the whole idea of providing health insurance -- this law forces companies to provide health insurance for companies working 30 hours. you have gone above and beyond and have for a long time. are you gb toing forced to make changes by the law or you'll stick with what you have right now? >> we're not going to make changes. we said that from the beginning. the thought we would actually reverse the situation that's worked for 20 people for our employees and make it worse for them as a result of the new law is ridiculous. what i'm surprised by, to be honest with you, is there are some companies in america that are using this law as a license
4:41pm
either not to provide spouses with health care or to change the number of hours so they are not within the law to provide health insurance. this is a situation, candidly, where the performance that starbucks has had this quarter and for this year, which is the best quarter and year financially, that is we have always linked the shareholders' value with, we've created value for our people. we're trying to build a great, long, enduring company that can stand the test of fim. the only way you can do that, in my view, is to build a business in which success is shared. and i think the health care law, of course it's flawed and of course it can be improved, but on balance with what the president and administration tried to do is provide health insurance for the 40 million people uninsured and create a evening playing field for those who did not have access. we have serious problems in the
4:42pm
country. we have serious problems with many, many issues. what we need, as we saw in the last two weeks with the government shutdown, more than any other time perhaps in our lifetime, is a bipartisan comprehensive long-term budget. and for both parties to come together on behalf of the american people. and for business leaders to understand that this new law is not a situation where we should use the law as an opportunity to provide less for our people but to use this law to provide more. and i think, you know, we're not better than any other company, but we are proof over a long period of time that you can build a company by balancing long-term value for your shareholders with long-term value for your people in the communities you serve. >> howard, let's talk earnings and business at hand. you said it was your best quarter. you're raising your dividend, raising comparable sales.
4:43pm
>> this quarter is a stunning quarter which caps, as i said, the best performing financial and operating year in the history of the company. for us have to 8 % comps and 7% globally at a time in the world where the consumer is still under pressure is such a significant accomplishment. in addition to that our consumer product grew at double digits. perhaps from an economic standpoint, our operating profit and eps was more than 2x over the growth of the company, which was 12%. this is a stunning performance and an indication of the trust and confidence that our customers around the world have in the starbucks brand and the level of innovation. with the opening of our new teavana stores and the opportunity for tea, we think it's an opportunity to globally create a situation for tea what we have done for coffee. i think we're very optimistic about the future and we think the wind is at our back. we have work to do. success is not an entitlement.
4:44pm
we're certainly concerned about the political issues around the world. candidly, acutely concerned about the political issues at home and for us whether or not we're going to face another situation come calendar first quarter whether we'll have another debate over the fall. >> so, you're seeing the consumer there. you're talking about second quarter earnings you're expecting of 54 cents a share. talk to us about the consumer today, whether it be teavana or starbucks coffee, what are they spending money on? are you seeing the consumer worried about things like the default or are they acting and behaving the way they have been in terms of spending money, howard? >> well, i think the greatest threat to the american consumer, unfortunately, is the situation in washington. and when the government was facing a shutdown and threat of default, no small or large business can be immune for that. we are in a unique position where starbucks has become a
4:45pm
very important part of people's lives n america around the world, and we're not immune either. but we've been able to navigate through the storm and we're cautiously optimistic about calendar '14. i will say if the government issues and polarization continues, it certainly will have an acute effect on consumer confidence and consumer behavior. no business can be immune. we need the government to be for the people and not put us through this situation again. however, you saw our performance in this quarter and the year, our ability to continue to innovate and to continue to surprise and delight our customers and exceed expectations, it's a stunning year for us. i'm so proud of our people and proud of the values of our company. >> no doubt. that's why you have fiscal expectations of 255 to 256 and board authorizing the dividend to be raised by 24%. howard, we know you have to get to the conference call. we appreciate you joining us
4:46pm
before that call. thank you so much. >> thank you, maria, very much. >> we'll see you soon. howard schultz, ceo at starbucks, reporting earnings. going to get on that call with analysts right now. we'll take a short break and then have reaction to the president's speech. we'll talk to two people who lost their health care plan. did the president win them back? so i c
4:47pm
4:48pm
an reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally.
4:49pm
welcome back. just a few minutes ago we heard from the president talking about health care reform and that he is going to move forward and stick to it for obama care despite any glitches. aside from those glitches, the big issue with the obama care rollout has been many americans feel like a promise was broken, that they could keep their health insurance if they liked it and yet learned later they couldn't at all. they're getting cancellation notices. we're joined by ordinary working people who have been shocked to find obama care means they cannot keep their plans and, in fact, will be paying a lot more money for their health insurance. should the president's speech just now make them feel better about the situation? with me healthier goldwater and debora, a real estate agent in california, who joined us monday, but we wanted to know your reaction to the speech. i'll kick it off with you. >> yeah. unfortunately, the president did not stay one single thing just now that makes me feel any more
4:50pm
confident that i am going to be able to afford the plan or that the plan is going to be any better. i really wish that he would stop repeating the same thing, which is, the that 19 million of us, approximately, have are inferior plans, substandard plans. please explain to me how my plan is a substandard plan, when in fact, i can go to any doctor that i want. i can go to any hospital that i want. the premium is lower than the premiums of several of the plans i have already looked at that are approved. i'd be paying more for the exchange plans than i am currently paying by a wide margin as i mentioned the other day, 65%, and i can't go to the doctors i want, i can't go to the hospitals i want and i don't
4:51pm
need the services that they are providing me that they deem everyone should have. i don't need, although some might argue, i don't need mental health coverage. >> i understand what you're saying. i just got an e-mail from a viewer that said there is absolutely nothing substandard about my plan. it's more comprehensive than the plans i had through an employer and now my plan is being cancelled. he's saying you're going to get a better plan. i understand what you're saying. let me ask you this, are you paying much more? remind our viewers. how much were you paying a month and what are you going pay? >> i am currently paying $293 a month. and under obama care, it's any place from $478 to $500 a month
4:52pm
for a quote, comparable plan to i have. i cannot go to my doctors or my hospital. so explain to me how it's better for me. >> heather, what's your situation? weigh in now. how much are you paying now? what do you expect to pay under the new law? >> right now i currently pay $510 a month. i own my own company. it was really hard for me to get insurance after i left cobra. i can go out. i have the doctors i love. i can go to the hospitals i want to. when i received a letter in july from my provider, cigna, they told me don't worry about anything. you do not need to take any action at this time. in october we will give you all the october you need and it's almost november 1 and i have not heard a word but they are cancelling my policy at the end of the year, 2013, and i can't get on a website that works.
4:53pm
i'm that 5% that he was talking about, but i'm also a new mom and i have a business that keeps me going 50 hours a week. he may think that it's okay for us, you know, well you're going to be fine. i have less than two months with a website that doesn't work and my own insurance company that's going to drop me in two months. guess what? they're not giving me any information. they told me don't do anything, you just stay back. that situation, i'm a little worried. >> these stories are troubling. we have got a lot of earnings that we have got to get to. we are trying to get to the bottom of this as well as talk to as many real people as we can who are actually experiencing the reality out there. thank you, ladies. we appreciate it. we will see you soon. facebook stock is on the move robust growth drove 60% increase
4:54pm
in revenue. stay with us. [ male announcer ] staying warm and dry has never been our priority. our priority is, was and always will be serving you, the american people. so we improved priority mail flat rate to give you a more reliable way to ship. now with tracking up to eleven scans, specified delivery dates, and free insurance up to $50 all for the same low rate. [ woman ] we are the united states postal service. [ man ] we are the united states postal service. [ male announcer ] and our priority is you. go to usps.com® and try it today.
4:55pm
before global opportunities were part of their investment strategy... before they funded scholarships to the schools that gave them scholarships... before they planned for their parents' future needs and their son's future... they chose a partner to help manage their wealth, one whose insights, solutions and approach have been relied on for over 200 years. that's the value of trusted connections. that's u.s. trust.
4:56pm
>> really, we have got to focus
4:57pm
on one name. that is facebook. it is a blowout quarter. no other way to describe it. 25 cents. the estimate was 95. revenue surged to $2.02 billion but the story is mobile ad revenue is 49%. facebook is basically a mobile stock company. >> brian, thank you so much. i will see you tomorrow. here is fast money.
4:58pm
with fidelity's options platform, we've completely integrated every step of the process, making it easier to try filters and strategies... to get a list of equity options... evaluate them with our p&l calculator... and execute faster with our more intuitive trade ticket. i'm greg stevens, and i helped create fidelity's options platform. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades
4:59pm
when you open an account. in a we believe outshining the competition tomorrow requires challenging your business inside and out today. at cognizant, we help forward-looking companies run better and run different - to give your customers every reason to keep looking for you. so if you're ready to see opportunities and see them through, we say: let's get to work. because the future belongs to those who challenge the present. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow.
5:00pm
go national. go like a pro. ♪ >> live from the nasdaq in new york city's time square, this is fast money, america's post market show. here is tonight's line-up. easy money is still flowing but is the bernanke boost for stocks running out of steam? shock and awe. it's a stock that is locked in stunning return so far this year. our traders are here tonight. let's